Writing thoughts

I kept up an intermittent diary on the Diamond Twig website and I aim to carry on with thoughts, ideas and what I am currently working at on this page. Don’t hold your breath! New plans for the upcoming months are to put Ren and the Blue Hands into an E-book format, and at the end of the year the last two books in the Blue Hands trilogy will be published. Lots of readings, teaching and grappling with social media and tech know-how in-between.

Sex in a YA novel

can be a tricky subject. It determines age readership suitability, and can cause controversy – such as Melvin Burgess who wrote Doing It, about young lads and their attitudes and experiences of it. Anne Fine suggested it was ‘filth’ should be published as an adult novel, if at all. 

Or Jack of Hearts and Other Parts by L.C. Rosen about male gay sex, which has just been published in the UK and reviewed by the Guardian as ‘Humane, sex-positive writing of the funniest, filthiest and most heartening kind.’ 

I have a sex scene that is a crucial plot point in my YA novel Ren and the Blue Hands.

Books like these might upset some people who think they ‘encourage’ young people in the ‘wrong sort of way’.

When I was a teenager I looked to books to teach me about things; there was a mystifying world of passionate feelings and complex emotions that I was on the edge of. I wanted to know more, but was fearful of getting out of my depth. Books like these YA novels didn’t exist in my youth, so I read adult books. So whatever Anne Fine thought, you can’t stop young readers searching for the stories and knowledge they want. These days, as some critics have pointed out, without positive books and role models, some young people look to pornography for answers and that’s more fictional and harmful than these thoughtful novels. 

We forget at our peril that young readers are switched-on and aware of the world and know when they are being patronised or lied to. They deserve the truth, even hard to bear truths. They already get a huge diet of vampires, violence, death and other difficult issues. Sex is no different. As long as it isn’t gratuitous or badly written, acknowledging a young protagonist’s physical urges and experiences is natural and can provide a strong narrative drive. 

Personally, I get a bit bored with the ‘girl pursues boy as love interest’ in teen novels as if that’s the only story. In Ren and the Blue Hands, class and power are intertwined in Ren’s relationship with Bark, which complicates the situation. Interestingly, when I began this novel, in the dim and distant past, my main character was called Mulberry (a name I still love) and when a friend read a draft copy, when it came to the sex scene she exclaimed ‘I was surprised by Mulberry’s nipple! I never thought of her as a sexual being.’

My friend’s advice was make her more physical, living in her body more throughout the story, so it led believably to the sex. 

I had to think hard about the story, the character and what I realised was her passivity. The key to changing it was giving her a new name: Ren. Mulberry had sounded like a nursery rhymish little girl. Ren was a short, strong name and immediately, I saw her in a completely different way. I rewrote a lot of the novel and it worked. There isn’t a lot of sex, but when it arises it’s relevant to plot and character, and I hope subtly done. 

Where do you start?

That’s the thorny question – with an idea? a phrase worming its way round your head? do you begin with pen and paper or go straight to the computer screen?

I’ve put one of my earliest published poems on the poem of the month page – not because I’m particularly proud of it, but it shows a new writer’s concern with writing – taking (pinching) lines from other poets, worrying about how to go about the writing and finding/making the time to write. I was 40 and pregnant with my second child when Modern Goddess was published with that poem in it. So, you might call me a late starter. 

It was often the way back in 1992 (yes, that’s how old I am). Julia and I believed in supporting new writers, particularly women, who we helped by publishing their first collections with our press Diamond Twig. 

Modern Goddess was our first publication and Inviolate, a poetry collection from Sara Park, was the last in 2011. I have finally closed the press down, along with the website, though it’s available as an archive. 

But it’s never too late to start anything new – seriously writing in my 40s, yoga at 53, and my first published novel, in 2016. I was 64. 

Now I’m learning how to handle social media, putting my YA novel Ren and the Blue Hands into an e-book format and getting to grips with running my own wordpress site.

Keep an eye out and you’ll find a new poem each month and you might discover my thoughts about the writing process and where I’m going to be giving readings or running workshops. For example:

Free Flowing Words at Hexham Library Thursday 7th February, at 7pm with another wonderful poet Joan Johnston.

And are you interested in writing poetry? then sign up for this:

Reading and Writing Poetry at the Lit & Phil

6pm – 8pm Mondays 25th February to 15th April 2019 

In this 8 week course we will look at and discuss various examples of contemporary poetry,

using this as a way of inspiring our own writing. The course will be led by Ellen Phethean

and Kathleen Kenny, two experienced writers and poetry tutors who will offer writing

exercises designed to break through creative barriers and ignite fresh ideas. These sessions

are open to anyone with an interest in poetic form are tailored to suit both new and more

experienced writers. 

To reserve a place telephone the Lit & Phil on 0191 232 0192

Course cost is £80 payable at the first meeting.

Thanks for reading this and the poem of the month.

Here’s an interview with me by Helen Walker talking about why I write and a performance we created for the celebration of Martin Luther King